Needle Pain

Needle pokes are one of the most common sources of pain for children seeking emergency medical care. Needle pokes may be used during healthcare visits to collect blood, deliver medication and fluids, or to numb certain body parts while stitching, for example. 

(Procedural Pain, 2019)

This video provides information about needle pokes and useful tips for parents and families who have a child that may require a needle poke.

This video was created through a collaboration between ECHO Research, TREKK, and ARCHE. Funding was provided by the Networks of Centres of Excellence and the Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation through the Women and Children’s Health Research Institute.

(Procedural Pain, 2019)

This infographic provides useful age-specific tips for parents and families who have a child that may require a needle poke.

This infographic was created through a collaboration between ECHO Research, TREKK, and ARCHE. Funding was provided by the Networks of Centres of Excellence and the Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation through the Women and Children’s Health Research Institute.

 

The information contained in this video/multimedia content (the “Multimedia”) is provided on an “as is” basis and is offered for general information and educational purposes only; it is not offered as and does not constitute professional advice. There is no guarantee about the accuracy, applicability, fitness or completeness of the information found in the Multimedia. This information is provided without warranty of any kind, and the University of Alberta, its agents, employees, and students disclaim responsibility to any party for any loss or damage of any kind that may arise directly or indirectly as a result of the use of or reliance on the information contained in the Multimedia.

© ECHO Research and ARCHE, 2020. These resources may not be modified, reproduced or distributed without prior written consent of ECHO Research. Contact shannon.scott@ualberta.ca.

ECHO

The ECHO research program is focused on improving health outcomes for children with acute health conditions through the application of the best available evidence — a process known as knowledge translation (KT).

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