Tag Archives: knowledge translation

Knowledge translation (KT) is formally defined by the CIHR as a “dynamic and iterative process that includes the synthesis, dissemination, exchange, and ethically sound application of knowledge to improve the health of Canadians, provide more effective health services and products and strengthen the health care system.”

Videos, ebooks help parents decide when children need to go to ER

Featured in the University of Alberta Folio, Drs. Shannon Scott and Lisa Hartling talk about their research programs and the health resources we have developed. The best way to inform parents of the latest evidence on the diagnosis and treatment of childhood illnesses is to tell them a story, according to the researchers behind an innovative program at the University of Alberta. “In Canada, one in five kids who go to the emergency room department don’t need to be there and could be treated elsewhere,” Continue reading →

From Clinical Trials to Picture Books: The Creative Challenge of Translating Research 

Featured in the University of Alberta Quad, our Stakeholder Engagement and Research Coordinator Michelle Chan writes about our research. If you have, or have ever taken care of, a young child, you might have experienced an unsettling panic when they start to exhibit symptoms of being unwell. Is that cough normal? Is it a cold? Is it croup? And what do you do about it? Instead of scrolling through websites with complex and confusing information, you could instead look through a simple and engaging infographic Continue reading →

Help us win the 2019 CIHR IHDCYH Talks Video Competition!

*This competition is now closed. Thank you to everyone who helped us by voting for our video!   We are thrilled to be in this year’s CIHR IHDCYH Talks Video Competition! We entered one of our newest videos – Cough, Cold, and Wheeze: How to help manage your child’s bronchiolitis.   Bronchiolitis is a viral infection that affects our breathing. It is most common in children under 2 years, and can be stressful for families and caregivers. Our video provides health information based on the Continue reading →

Celebrating CIHR’s Faces of Health Research

Each year, over 2.3 million children visit hospital emergency departments in Canada. Many of these visits are for minor conditions that could be treated at home or in other settings.   Closing the research-practice gap is fundamental to improving the efficiency of health care delivery to children and their families. Dr. Shannon Scott and Dr. Lisa Hartling are working together to improve health outcomes for children with acute health conditions through knowledge translation. Dr. Scott directs a research program called translating Evidence in Child Health Continue reading →

Spotlight on Shannon Scott: Empowering Parents through Research-Based Evidence

Dr. Shannon Scott uses the power of stories to ensure that up-to-date research on child health is placed in the hands of parents, families, healthcare professionals, and policy-makers. Parents want to be involved in their children’s healthcare, and in order to be included, access to the latest research that is easy to understand has to be readily available. Unfortunately, in Canada, this isn’t always the case. Dr. Shannon Scott—Professor at the University of Alberta Faculty of Nursing, Canada Research Chair for Knowledge Translation in Child Continue reading →

WCHRI 2019 Graduate Studentship

  Congratulations to Chentel Cunningham on being awarded a WCHRI 2019 Graduate Studentship!! Chentel is a doctoral student with ECHO and a Nurse Practitioner at the Stollery Children’s Hospital. Her research focuses on knowledge translation in relation to pediatric heart failure. We are so proud of you Chentel! See the WCHRI announcement to find a full list of awarded applicants.

Interested in our tool development process?

When it comes to developing our parent tools, we make sure to involve families in the process from start to finish.  This image gives you a snapshot into what our research process looks like for each of the knowledge translation (KT) tools we develop for families and caregivers. These tools/health resources provide information based on the latest research about the symptoms of common childhood conditions, how to manage them at home, and when to seek care. If you are interested in getting involved in our Continue reading →

Dr. Rachel Flynn awarded 2019 WCHRI Postdoctoral Fellowship

Congratulations to ECHO post-doctoral fellow Dr. Rachel Flynn on being awarded one of the 2019 WCHRI Postdoctoral Fellowships! Dr. Flynn is evaluating the sustainability of research-based products used to improve child health. Her fellowship will provide evidence for further research on how to rigorously evaluate sustainability outcomes and develop strategies to use research-based products. Thank you to the Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation, through the Women and Children’s Health Research Institute for providing the funding for this fellowship. A huge congratulations to the other recipients (a Continue reading →

Specially Commended – 2018 IHDCYH Talks Video Competition

The CIHR Institute of Human Development, Child and Youth Health (IHDCYH) is dedicated to developmental, physical and mental well-being throughout the life cycle from a population perspective. Their annual video competition, called IHDCYH Talks, is intended to improve knowledge translation of research within IHDCYH’s mandate and help demonstrate the impact that evidence can and does have on maternal, reproductive, child and youth health in Canada.   We are thrilled to announce that our video on ear infections in children was awarded a Special Commendation supported Continue reading →

Dr. Shannon Scott Distinguished Researcher

  Officially announced on September 10, 2018, seven top researchers will be able to take their work in children’s health to the next level, thanks to a $5-million gift from the Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation, and support from the University of Alberta & Alberta Health Services. Dr. Shannon Scott and co-investigator Dr. Lisa Hartling are among the seven Distinguished Researchers, and will use their funding to expand their research programs. Dr. Scott and Dr. Hartling work with families of children suffering from acute illnesses that commonly present to the Continue reading →