Tag Archives: child health

Child health settings are unique, multidisciplinary settings encompassing a wide-range of healthcare professionals. Previous research points to the unique challenges of child health settings including higher emotional investment from health care professionals, the expectation of family-centered care, and unique ethical situations.

What to do when your child has croup

  Croup is a common respiratory illness caused by a viral infection. It can cause swelling of the upper airway, including the windpipe (trachea), voice box (larynx) and vocal cords. This swelling can lead to a hoarse voice, barky cough and sometimes difficulty breathing. It occurs most often in babies and children up to 3 years of age because their airways are smaller, but older children can also get it. Croup most often happens in the fall and winter months, but it can happen in any Continue reading →

When to go to the hospital with childhood vomiting and diarrhea

Gastroenteritis is an infection of the bowel (intestines) caused by a virus or bacteria that can cause diarrhea and vomiting. It is common in infants and children, and can cause the loss of important fluids and minerals (dehydration). Find out about Salima and Ali’s experiences with gastroenteritis through an interactive story book. Browse through the interactive gastroenteritis page for information on the signs, symptoms, treatment and management of gastroenteritis and what to do if you are a parent or family dealing with gastroenteritis. This eBook was Continue reading →

Do you know a child dealing with chronic pain?

While acute pain is our body’s way of letting us know something is wrong, chronic pain is very different, and can persist for months or years. This eBook shares Megan and her family’s experiences dealing with chronic pain, the struggle to achieve daily activities, and how the family learned to manage and cope with Megan’s pain. This eBook and associated breathing exercises were created through a collaboration between ECHO Research, the Stollery Children’s Hospital Foundation, and the Women and Children’s Health Research Institute (WCHRI).

Knowledge translation – using what we know!

“The purpose of knowledge translation in children’s health care is to make sure that the decisions that are being made are informed by the latest research.” – Dr. Shannon Scott Using what we know: bringing evidence and practice to parents.   This article was featured in the winter 2009–2010 edition of the University of Alberta, Faculty of Nursing magazine following Dr. Shannon Scott’s Avenue Magazine award as one of Edmonton’s Top 40 Under 40.